Ethernet


Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet,fiber networks are classic cable networks. The advantages of wired networks are stability, security, range and transmission rate. The acquisition costs are comparatively low. The major disadvantage of cable networks is of course the installation effort if there is no existing wiring and the lack of mobility of the connected to the cable network components.

Ethernet Switch
Ethernet Switch
An Ethernet switch is the central node within a wired...
Ethernet Sockets
Ethernet Sockets
RJ-45 Ethernet sockets / network sockets are available in...
Ethernet Equipment
Ethernet Equipment
Whether an LSA insertion tool, RJ-45 connector, cable tester...
SFP / SFP+ Transceiver
SFP / SFP+ Transceiver
An SFP module (Small Form-Factor Pluggable) is a very...
Ethernet Cable
Ethernet Cable
Ethernet cables are used to connect components involved in a...

If one wishes to make use of the internet's capabilities, a fundamental question must be addressed from the outset: Wired or wireless? In the early days of the internet, wired LAN networks were quite commonplace, but nowadays, almost every household has WiFi. Nevertheless, a LAN network still offers numerous advantages, even in the era of WiFi, which should be carefully weighed, especially during home construction.


WiFi or LAN?

For those planning a new home, many considerations come to mind, as these decisions are ones that should stand the test of time. It's worth contemplating a wired LAN setup, as retrofitting cables later on may require reopening walls or dealing with an unsightly tangle of cables throughout the house – neither of which is a pleasant prospect. However, it's essential to be aware that a LAN cabling during home construction is not a cost-effective endeavor. Planning for multiple connections per room is necessary to control the electronics in the house and still have space for devices. It's equally crucial not to compromise on the quality of the cables. At the time of purchase, consider that the technology will have to compete with newer standards in years or decades, so opting for the latest cables on the market (currently CAT6 or even CAT7) is advisable. Installing LAN cables does not mean committing exclusively to a wired network. Instead, it creates an option to leverage the advantages of a wired network. This allows, for instance, connecting one or more devices in a LAN network and working with particularly sensitive data. One of the significant advantages of LAN, in addition to high data transfer speeds, is the increased security compared to a WiFi network. Additionally, a separate wireless network can be set up for mobile devices like smartphones and notebooks alongside the LAN network. LAN networks are particularly useful when transferring large amounts of data over considerable distances. With current CAT5 and CAT6 network cables, distances of half a kilometer or more are possible, while CAT7 can achieve up to 10 kilometers. Twisted-pair cables, which must have excellent quality, or, even better, modern fiber-optic cables can be used. Even for high-resolution live video transmissions, fast data exchange is extremely important to achieve flawless picture and sound quality. In this scenario, LAN is undoubtedly superior to WiFi. Today, Ethernet technology is primarily used for LAN networks, whereas other technologies like Token Ring or FDDI were prevalent in the past.
 

Components in the LAN Network
In addition to the installation of cabling, ideally concealed behind walls, only a few individual components are necessary for a LAN network. The cables should ideally possess good quality and be laid in special cable conduits, ensuring both disturbance-free transmission and relatively uncomplicated replacement if needed. A device called a switch can now be attached to the network connection. This then acts as the interface between the network and the end device. The switch has multiple ports to which end devices can be connected via network cables. If the network needs expansion, another switch can be connected through a free port in the form of an uplink. Modern Ethernet switches can simultaneously take on the role of a router, thereby including WiFi devices in the network. As not all devices use the same technology, switches also serve as adapters. They typically have so-called 10/100 ports, supporting transmission rates of both 10 Mbit/s and Fast Ethernet with 100 Mbit/s. The latest switches even have 10/100/1000 ports, incorporating Gigabit Ethernet. Depending on the transmission rates supported by the connected devices, an agreement is reached via the port, which can identify communicating devices via MAC (Media Access Code), on the fastest possible transmission rates. Through Power over Ethernet (PoE) technology, devices can be connected to the internet and supplied with power via the network cable. This eliminates the need for power cables and helps keep cable clutter and socket occupancy to a minimum. Fast data transfer and high security – Ethernet, therefore, offers many advantages. However, for those who have not yet laid cables, there is a certain effort involved. Whether one ultimately opts for this or for the easy-to-install and flexible WiFi depends on the requirements that will be placed on the network later. Our customer service is happy to assist you in the decision-making process and answer your questions about LAN, Ethernet, and WiFi!